Camping in Menagesha Forest

We’re lucky to have a great spot as close as an hour to Addis Ababa that we can spend a weekend camping and feel like you’ve been on holiday for a week when you come back to the city dirty and dusty. These shots are from Mika’s first camping trip we took with a group of friends I work with here in February 2016.

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There are several camping spots in the park this is for sure our favourite under the trees with loads of spots to hang hammocks and settle really in.

Mikas first camping trip at 9 months – her small camp chair was a big hit and she certainly owned it!

Was so fun to be there with our friends, get time to hang out and relax for the weekend.

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The forest is pretty stunning to hike up through. We’ve seen colobus monkeys before and baboons even came to visit the campsite.

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Taking a hike

Mika got into the backpack for the first time and we went for a hike. About 10 minutes in she passed out.

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The crew

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Exploring Lalibela with Mika

In May we decided it was time to take on our first real adventure as a team – Mika and I. We headed to Lalibela, Mika in the backpack, for a long weekend with a friend visiting Ethiopia, Jenn, who I had taught with in India and Chris a friend and colleague from school in Addis.

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Standing in front of St George Church

It was certainly a different experience for me and I was grateful to help friends to help us out along the way as I developed my new skills of how to travel rough with a baby. Lucky for me Mika is such a social wee girl, loves being in the backpack and is up for as much as an adventure as I am.

 

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Mika sitting in the entrance to one of the churches

It was a great weekend exploring the city and churches and I was glad for the company and support to help carry Mika around in the heat. She loved the priests and their crosses.

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Making friends everywhere

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The markets are always one of my favourite places when I travel. I love seeing what is for sale, how people go about their sales and trades, the movement and conversations. This market did not disappoint it was bustling with so much activity and friendly faces welcoming us.

On Sunday morning Jenn and I got up early to head down to one of the cluster of churches to see how busy it would be when service was happening. We weren’t disappointed, around every corner there were floods of people praying, priests blessing people and movement in and out of the churches.

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Young girl we met outside one of the churches

 

We had a great weekend exploring the town, churches and markets — this girl is always smiling, always waving, always happy… thank you Lalibela for your warmth and beautiful people just like my little Habesha.

Trekking in Tigray…

A few friends and I spent a four day weekend at the end of May trekking in Tigray organised by Tesfa Tours. It was a few days that felt like weeks away from the bustle of Addis and work and we were treated to hiking in some of the most stunning landscape I have ever seen.

Views from top on Day3

Views from top of the plateau we hiked up onto Day 3

A quick flight up from Addis Ababa to Axum and then 2 hour drive East to the start of our trek not far from Adigrat. We pulled off the side of the road and were met by two local men and their donkeys who would carry our bags for the day up to our first guesthouse perched at 3,000m up at Enaf. We stepped out of the van and within ten minutes set off up the trail.

Donkeys loaded up

Donkey loaded up with our shared bags

The walk up for the first day was gradual and once we got off the gravel road the landscape changed and we could see amazing views across the valley ahead of us. As we negotiated our way along the plateau it opened up and we were met with children herding goats and sheep home for the night and excited to see guests approaching before the hurried off down the steep side of the cliffs to the valley below and home for the night.

Panorama view of the valley and guesthouse

Panorama view of the valley and guesthouse at Enaf

As we stood on the cliff top gazing at the breath taking views across the Agame massif and villages below you couldn’t help but feel tiny as the huge and stunning landscape reached as far as the eye could see. We settled into the guesthouse, had a quick dinner and headed to bed early falling asleep to the sounds of donkeys calling out in the valley below.

Sunrise on the start of day 2

The sunrise at the start of day 2

We woke up to a beautiful sunrise which slowly revealed the stunning valley and landscape below. As the sun got higher more mountain peaks started to appear and we could see in the far distance where we were headed over the next few days.

Stunning views across the valley below

Views across the valley below

Looking out the doorway from the guesthouse

Looking out the doorway from the guesthouse

Before we set off walking we ate our breakfast of scrambled eggs and bread on the rooftop of the guesthouse. As you can see the view wasn’t too bad from up there.

Breakfast on the rooftop of the Guesthouse at

Breakfast on the rooftop of the Guesthouse at Enaf

One of the ladies who took care of our meals at the guesthouse

One of the ladies who took care of our meals at the guesthouse

Another of our stunning cooks from the guesthouse

Another of our stunning cooks from the guesthouse

The guard at the guesthouse pulled his gun out to pose for a photo

The guard at the guesthouse pulled his gun out to pose for a photo with a view

As we made our way along the edge of the plateau we shared the trail with donkeys, cows, sheep, goats and their minders making their way up the paths towards higher grazing areas. We then started the long decent down into the valley below and continued along it and up towards our next guesthouse.

Heading down into the valley

Heading down into the valley

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Heading along a trail

Finally down in the valley

Finally down in the valley

We arrived at the next guesthouse, Gohgot, which was tucked in at the bottom of a cliff.  After a hearty lunch meal of shiro and injera and rested for a few hours in the afternoon in preparation for another hike to a nearby rock-hewn church.

Panorama from guesthouse 2

Panorama from guesthouse at Gohgot

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Young girl at the guesthouse

In the afternoon we took in a two hour round hike to Gohgot Eyesus church which was tucked up in one of the nearby valleys. We had to hail the priest to bring the key and climb with us so we could go inside before climbing up to the entrance.

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Gohgot Eyesus church

Priests hands

The priest clasps his cross

Mother & baby on the trail

Mother & baby on the trail

On the third day the scenery changed we trekked across the valley for a few hours passing schools, people busy farming, and by children running out to greet us before we started our climb up another mountain.

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Donkeys carrying water joined us as we crossed the valley and approached our next climb

The climb led us along trails that weaved along the edge of the cliff and provided spectacular views across the valley where we had come from over the past few days.

Panorama of the trail

The donkey comes along the trail while Meghan waits up ahead looking over the valley we have just crossed

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Nathan heading up the final climb to the plateau

Sheep on day 3

Some sheep who greeted us at the top

The plateau we were staying on for the last night was quite small with only four families homes on top and the guesthouse. This offered us stunning views of the Gheralta Mountains in the distance, where we would be heading the next day to visit one of the rock-hewn churches, and all sides of the valleys around us.

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View out one side of the plateau

The guest house of day 3 at Shimbrety

The guest house at Shimbrety perched on the edge of the plateau

We visited with a family who lived next to the guesthouse and shared the always great Ethiopian hospitality, coffee and conversation. One of the young boys from the family had joined us earlier in the day as we had explored the edge of the cliff and watched a family of Gelada baboons make their way around the cliff edges, playing, eating and enticing one another.

The hoodie gang

The hoodie gang

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One of the girls from the family

One of the girls from the family

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A pile of cow pooh once dried used for lighting fires and building walls

Again the next morning we woke up early and looked like someone had taken a paint brush to the sky and then keep spraying new colours across the canvas as the sun rose. The low cloud made for some spectacular scenes as it wrapped itself around the cliffs and covered the valley below.

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Sunrise…

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Low clouds over the valley

Sunrise

A young girl came out to meet us as her dog barked and warned us to stay well clear of her home. It was a sweet exchange as she asked for her photo to be taken and once she saw flashed a smile it headed back to her house pleased. (The photo will make its way back up to her in the new trekking season after the rains!)

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The colours she was wearing matched the landscape

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The polaroid came out for the final time and we took and shared some photos with our great hosts  before we headed off down the side of the mountain and onto our final adventure and climb to Abuna Yemata church.

From the final guesthouse

Loads of beautiful people and smiles

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One of the final views as we reached the valley below

I would recommend this trip to anyone who loves nature, people and doing something that will give you a real taste of Ethiopian culture and the beauty of this country. I would go again tomorrow…. Want to make this journey too? Contact Tesfa Tours based in Addis Ababa – community based tourism. Email info@tesfatours.com http://www.tesfatours.com/contact-tesfa-tours/

Also helps to have great friends along on the journey!

More than FAITH needed – Ethiopia

We picked up our local guide Gebre from a small town as we headed towards the Gheralta Mountains. After four days of trekking through breathtaking landscape of Tigray in Northern Ethiopia we were headed for our final adventure before heading back to Addis, our visit to the rock-hewn church of Abuna Yemata Guh tucked away in some cliffs a hair raising climb away.

Starting the walk towards the rock face we need to climb

Starting the walk towards the rock face we need to climb

The churches in the Gheralta cluster of churches, around 30, are believed by locals to have been built back in the 4th to 6th century but its more commonly thought they were built between the 9th and 12th centuries. Either way they are phenomenal in their location, structure and certainly not built for those afraid of heights. If you’re wanting to get closer to God and have your prayers sent on up – you’re certainly in the right place by taking an adventure here.

A young girl herding the goats

A young girl herding the goats

Even though I had visited the area and this church five years earlier, and had been rambling on about it to my friends for weeks, nothing looked familiar. When we pulled off the road to park I still couldn’t make out the rock face we had climbed years earlier and was convinced we were in the wrong place. However, as we started our walk across the flat valley towards the rock face my memory partly restored and the landscape reveled a glimpse at the climb up ahead of us.

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The church entrance is tucked around the backside of the right hand rock pillar and completely out of sight until you enter the cave door. Unless you have a local guide you would possibly never find it as once you reach the rock face there is no clear path showing the way.
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The walk across the valley floor leading up is gradual and starts to reveal how steep the final parts of the decent will be but its not until you hit the end of the trail that you realise what is potentially ahead of you. It was mid morning when we reached the face and already hot when we started to use our hands to help negotiate the first section of the climb over the rocks.
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Once we reached the free climb section which consisted of sandstone walls we were asked to take our shoes off and leave them in order to continue the climb. At this point we had reached what was considered the church grounds and taking our shoes off also provided much needed grip for the 90 degree rock face we were ascending.
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The pack of men who had joined us and we had all been thinking the same thing “I can carry my own bag and I really don’t need your help”, soon became our safety nets and mules for safely carrying our bags and supporting us up the rock faces. They placed themselves ahead and behind us offering protection and guidance for every small foot and hand hold we could use. This is when my battle with keeping my camera out and the men looking at me slightly flustered asking to take it began. My stubbornness versus their extensive knowledge and climbing ability were a fine match which they eventually won and only the iPHONE stayed out.
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I had warned my friends that there was one tough section that really was like rock climbing but I hadn’t remembered it being as challenging or long as it seemed this time – maybe my age was catching up to me, I certainly didn’t feel as nimble as I had years earlier but also was on my own so wasn’t thinking about others.  I worried about the stress I was putting my friend through and hoped that I hadn’t built the view and church up to something more than what it was and I had remembered. I wondered if maybe the exhilaration of the climb had made the church and its location seem amazing and I did my own little prayer that they would be as impressed and amazed by the whole experience as I was.
The entrance to the church is along this ledge

Friends and Gebre peaking out the entrance to the church is along this ledge you make the final walk

So many questions entered my mind again as I reached the final ledge that you have to walk leading to the cave like entrance of the
Why? How? Why was it built here? How did they do it?
The view out the doorway of the entrance

The view out the doorway of the church entrance

As we rested in the church looking at the paintings, catching our breath and pondering how difficult the climb down would be seeing where you were headed, Gebre told us about the history of the church. He mentioned and showed us where the elders would rest and how baptisms happened at the church – mothers would climb with their babies up to have them baptised. We all looked at each other as if he was possibly joking – no joke. I certainly sat humbled at people’s conviction to their faith and the heights they would go to in order to get their blessings and have their prayers heard.

9 of the 12 apostles on the roof of the church

9 of the 12 apostles on the roof of the church

Old paintings cover the walls

Old paintings cover the walls

The priest shows us old texts

The priest shows us old texts

Old texts inside Abun

Old texts

The climb down was epic but not as frightening as anticipated. With our new built trust in our guides and the adrenaline still pumping we were all pretty pleased to reach our shoes and resume the walk on more level ground.

Is the climb worth it? Yep… I’d do it a third time for sure!

The climb down

Meghan & Edy negotiating the climb down

2014… its been a journey

When I look back on 2014 I realise just how many opportunities I have had, amazing people I have met, the new friends I have made, and lands I have walked. Always feel super privileged to see and do all of it…. not without some challenges but these are character building and make 2015 another year to look forward to. Get out there and see the world, meet people, break down stereotypes and change peoples views!
Adventure is out there waiting!

The year that was 2014

The year that was 2014

My home in New Zealand

A beautiful evening on the beach at my hometown in New Zealand (January 2014)

View from up Mount Maunganui looking down over the beach, New Zealand

View from up Mount Maunganui looking down over the beach, New Zealand (January 2014)

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Children in peak out of a makeshift school tent following Typhoon Yolanda, Philippines (February 2014)

Roofless, Homeless but not HOPELESS, Tacloban Philippines

Roofless, Homeless but not HOPELESS, Tacloban Philippines (February 2014)

Rodolfo (73) sat with his wife Guadalupe outside their newly built home and explained to me how he survived Typhoon Yolanda. With his wife away visiting family in Manila, he stayed in their home only 30 meters from the shoreline until he saw the water level rising too high and then evacuated to the Elementary school. During the typhoon he tried to wade back through waist deep water to save some rice and supplies from his house but saw his house was flattened by coconut trees and under water. Thankful for the support to rebuild their home from external donors & a community effort led by Marie Ann Corsino they were surround by family and happy to still have one another Luan Village Leyte, Philippines.

Rodolfo (73) sat with his wife Guadalupe outside their newly built home and explained to me how he survived Typhoon Yolanda. With his wife away visiting family in Manila, he stayed in their home only 30 meters from the shoreline until he saw the water level rising too high and then evacuated to the Elementary school. During the typhoon he tried to wade back through waist deep water to save some rice and supplies from his house but saw his house was flattened by coconut trees and under water. Thankful for the support to rebuild their home from external donors & a community effort led by Marie Ann Corsino they were surround by family and happy to still have one another Luan Village Leyte, Philippines. (February 2014)

Small things make a huge difference. Children celebrate receiving new shoes after Typhoon Yolanda, Philippines (February 2014)

Small things make a huge difference. Children celebrate receiving new shoes after Typhoon Yolanda, Philippines (February 2014)

Testing out a camera with children at a school in Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Testing out a camera with children at a school in Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Happy faces at a school in Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Happy faces at a school in Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Shy schoolgirl hides her smile, Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Shy schoolgirl hides her smile, Arusha, Tanzania (March 2014)

Hong Kong Harbour as the sun goes down (iPHONEOGRAPHY) April 2014

Star Ferry crosses Hong Kong Harbour as the sun goes down (iPHONEOGRAPHY) (April 2014)

Two of my favourite boys kicking back having a laugh, Rwanda (June 2014)

Two of my favourite boys kicking back having a laugh, Rwanda (June 2014)

Back at the No.41 House (check them out www.no41.org) Rwanda (July 2014)

Back at the No.41 House, Rwanda (July 2014)

Check out No41 here www.no41.org

A sweet young girl who came walking up all curious outside a local school (iPHONEOGRAPHY) Rwanda (July 2014)

A sweet young girl who came walking up all curious outside a local school, Rwanda (iPHONEOGRAPHY) (July 2014)

The sun goes down over the land of 1000 hills, Rwanda (July 2014)

The sun goes down over the land of 1000 hills, Rwanda (July 2014)

I first met Scraggles and fell in love with her, my street dog in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (August 2014)

I first met Scraggles and fell in love with her, my street dog in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (August 2014)

Check out her transformation story, photos & video here… https://strengthinvulnerability.com/2014/11/17/scraggles-her-transformation/

Four friends at a school in Woliso, Ethiopia (September 2014)

Four friends at a school in Woliso, Ethiopia (September 2014)

Peaking out, schoolgirls in Woliso, Ethiopia (September 2014)

Peaking out, schoolgirls in Woliso, Ethiopia (September 2014)

Juggling down the beach, Zanzibar Tanzania (October 2014)

Juggling down the beach, Zanzibar Tanzania (October 2014)

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Friends help with smiles, Ethiopia (November 2014)

And as the sun goes down on 2014… I finish the year back home in New Zealand with friends and family before heading back to Ethiopia in a few weeks!

“Not all those who wander are lost”

At the time I said NO photos!

Looking back now I am glad people didn’t listen and did record the event as trying to explain this to anyone would not have the impact of the photos and the video below.

Yes thats me on the bed being carried like the Queen of Sheba minus the fanning and a little less enjoyable due to the pain I was in.

What was I doing you ask?

The story isn’t that exciting. I was on a school trip and this happened on the second day visit to a school where our students were working on the foundations of a classroom and doing activities with the kids at the local school. You can see more images of those images here

I slipped in the mud on a bank while I was reaching for some of the kids phones I was going to get out of the rain. The rest is history as they say… snapped ligaments and a couple of fractures later, a short surgery, a couple of pins and a cast and boot for 3 months!

At the time this was the most embarrassing moment of my life being the center of attention and having to be carried out of the village on someones bed from their home which they connected some wood to the ends in order to carry me.  However, after the diagnosis I didn’t feel as embarrassed about the experience. It seems to have provided my friends with a lot of entertainment so thought I would share it publicly…

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This is the reality for many people living in rural areas where there is no access  to the road. I have seen many people being carried in Rwanda and other countries where medical resources are limited. Was certainly appreciative of the kindness of strangers helping the ferengi out of the village! Wait till I return!

 

Sharing Smiles… one photo at a time

I love taking photos but I think I love giving them to people more… in India I used to go with friends on the weekend to hang out with beautiful children at Mumbai Mobile Creches and shoot portraits, print them and give them to the kids. The children always started off shy but as soon as we printed out the first image they would be eagerly wanting to be next and with so many centres around the city we could always find another one to head to.

After seeing the joy from these children receiving such a simple thing as a photo I started delivering photos back to people on the street who I took photos of… again and again the excitement and joy was priceless and gave me more happiness than taking the image and sharing it with people. Giving back a image to the person who was in it was something special – knowing that for some of them it was the only image they had when we obsessively now share images of ourselves and others daily.

This continued when I traveled to other cities and countries and the response always has always been a big SMILE back and huge appreciation. Check out some of the images below and see how you can come share some more smiles with me!

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The first photo they ever got to keep of themselves! My first time in a Mumbai Mobile Creche which had me hooked right away.

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In the Ger in the Mongolian countryside I was able to take and immediately print this! Was priceless to watch him as it printed!

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Best gummy smile

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” It’s me! ” Originally he thought he wasn’t getting his own picture as the photo was of him and his brother. His reaction to getting his own picture was amazing!

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Anticipation builds as the photos print

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Sharing smiles!

A young boy & his father at CURE Hospital in Addis Ababa Ethiopia watch their image print out

A young boy & his father at CURE Hospital in Addis Ababa Ethiopia watch their image print out

Carefully studying his photo

Carefully studying his photo with his Dad

So now I have something even more portable which can print straight from the camera and I can share immediately with kids and people I met on my journeys.  So often I hear people promise to send photos back and wonder how often they do… I love that I can right away hand over a picture to someone and see them smile right away at it.

Wanna help SHARE SMILES ?

If you send me some polaroid paper, include a self addressed envelope and I will send you back one of the images taken with your paper along with the story of where it was taken and the shared smile!

Send the paper to;

International Community School of Addis Ababa
Tash McCarroll
P.O. Box 70282
Addis Ababa
Ethiopia

P.S. Just indicate paper only on the packing tag (not camera paper)

See the images below for the paper packet – its super small and light weight.
Polaroid premium ZINK paper 2 x 3″ goes with the Polaroid Z2300 camera.

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Come share some SMILES with me!