Walking in Dian Fossey’s footsteps… Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

“When you realise the value of all life, you dwell less on what has past and concentrate on the preservation of the future” – Dian Fossey

A silver back sitting eating in the Volacnoes National Park, Rwanda

A silver back sitting eating in the Volacnoes National Park, Rwanda

It seemed fitting to finally trek and visit where Dian Fossey or Nyiramacyibili, as local Rwandans call her, had spent her days researching and working so hard to protect the mountain gorillas in Rwanda and neighbouring DRC and Uganda.

So a few days after our climb in the DRC we were meant to hike to the top of Bisoke to view the crater lake but with sore and tired legs we decided to take a smaller hike and visit Karisoke and the area Dian Fossey had spent so much time in working to protect the mountain gorillas in Rwanda.

Sunrise over Sabiyano Volcano

Sunrise over Sabiyano Volcano in the Virunga Volcano Range

We set off early in the morning ahead of the groups trekking to the Gorillas – hoping maybe we might stumble upon them first and have a wee glimpse at the great apes she had worked so hard to protect.

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Walking through farmland towards the park and Bisoke

“Little did I know then that by setting up two small tents in the wilderness of the Virungas I had launched the beginnings of what was to become an internationally renowned research station eventually to be utilized by students and scientists from many countries.”  — Dian Fossey, writing in her book “Gorillas in the Mist,” about the founding of the “Karisoke” Research Center, a name she created from the nearby Mt. Karisimbi and Mt. Visoke (Bisoke). 

There were signs along the trail that one of the Gorilla groups were near. We saw prints and fresh pooh but they stayed hidden from us amongst the forest and we were all hoping to catch a quick glimpse of them but it was not to be.

Gorilla prints fresh on the trail

Gorilla prints fresh on the trail

I can’t recommend this hike enough. I have been up into this range of mountains three times prior to this, each time on a different mountain and every time has been different in the trail and the experience. The jungle on this trek was nothing short of stunning throughout the hike, that alone and the views of the mountains (we did have an exceptionally clear day) were truly breath taking – along with knowing you were trudging the trail a true legend had many times before.

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Becoming at one with nature

At 2967 meters the trail splits, with the left branch leading to the grave site of Dian Fossey and the right climbing to the summit of Bisoke.

IMG_9808_thumbWe reached the area Dian Fossey and her team lived in worked in which was a  relatively flat area that was being reclaimed by the forest. There were many pieces of the old buildings still remaining in place and we could see why she had chosen such an amazing spot to live and protect the gorillas.

IMG_4990Dian Fossey spent 18 years in and out of the forest studying and trying to protect the Mountain Gorillas. She brought much attention to their plight and surely without her efforts they would certainly not be around today. In 1967 she founded Karisoke research centre – those two tents she first set up were the beginnings of a world known research centre. Sadly on December 27 in 1985 Dian Fossey was killed at the age of 54. There are many theories on her murder but it was never determined who killed her.

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Dian Fosseys grave – known to the people of Rwanda as Nyiramacyibili

The Gorilla graveyard was the final place we stopped at on our visit to the area. It was quiet and peaceful with beautiful light coming through the trees. Dian was laid to rest along one of her favourite gorillas Digit who she had met in 1967 but was brutally killed by poachers in 1977.

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Her beloved Digit’s gravesite right next to where Dian Fossey was laid to rest

Learn more about the Volcanoes National Park here and other treks you can do or visit Rwanda Tourism to learn more about activities in Rwanda.

To book your trek to visit and pay respects to Dian Fossey visit  contact reservation@rwandatourism.com

The trek costs $75 usd and you will need to have your own transport as you have to meet at the park head quarters in the morning and be transported across to the trek.

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Ruzizi Lodge, Akagera Rwanda

I’ve been fortunate to take two trips to Akagera National Park in Rwanda and stay at the chilled and stunning Ruzizi lodge on the banks of lake Ihema that boarders Tanzania in the east of Rwanda. Everything at the lodge is relaxing and scenic — from the walkways that connect the lodge, the outdoors dining area and the tents to the monkeys swinging through the trees in the morning. Just a 2 hour drive from Kigali you can find yourself in the Park on a game drive and after a long hot day in the park its a perfect retreat kicking back in your bed just gazing out to the lake and listening to nature.

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One of the best parts about the lodge is that there are only 9 tents so its never too busy. You have your own private patio area at the front of your tent.

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The lodge prides itself on being eco-conscious and is entirely solar powered. The dining location is unbeatable for a view of sunrise over the lake. Dinner and breakfast are a real treat – watching from a raised platform that serves as a dining room. The hippos sometimes pop their heads up to say hello, the monkeys playing, and the many bird species at the end of the day settling into the trees for the night.

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The raised wooden pathways are gently woven into the trees un-interrupting nature and just letting it get on with itself lead to the tents that are hidden amongst the trees.

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Visited by monkeys in the morning swinging through the trees – if you leave the window shades to the tent and door shades up you can watch them from your bed running around the front of the tent and swinging across the trees.

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Likewise at night you may get visited by a hungry hippo – don’t panic the tents are raised and so they can’t get to you. Although I have to admit with the complete stillness of the night and the noise they make it can be quite exciting. We were fortunate enough to have one come up around the lodge after dinner so we could watch it grazing on the grass and then another was around our tent crashing about in and out of the lake for a while at night so we got to watch it as well.

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The park itself is monitored by African Parks. The park has flourished since my last visit “Animal numbers have doubled since the first aerial census in 2010, when estimations put fewer than 6,000 large mammals in the park. The most recent 2015 census counted over 12,000 large mammals, revealing that populations of elephant, buffalo, waterbuck, zebra, topi, warthog, roan antelope and our newly reintroduced lion have all increased!” Amazing!

Lions were released into the park just a few days after my last trip in 2015. It has been amazing to follow their progress and reintroduction back  which is an exciting re-addition for Rwanda and Akagera. Their population has already doubled, births of seven cubs in 2016 and have even been spotted climbing trees!

The views around the park are stunning, especially from some of the higher spots in the park looking down over the lake. If you’re headed to Rwanda this is a great place for a weekend getaway, its a lot cheaper than many other safaris on the continent at just $35 usd for international travellers. For more information on the park and getting there visit African Parks website.

Camping in Menagesha Forest

We’re lucky to have a great spot as close as an hour to Addis Ababa that we can spend a weekend camping and feel like you’ve been on holiday for a week when you come back to the city dirty and dusty. These shots are from Mika’s first camping trip we took with a group of friends I work with here in February 2016.

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There are several camping spots in the park this is for sure our favourite under the trees with loads of spots to hang hammocks and settle really in.

Mikas first camping trip at 9 months – her small camp chair was a big hit and she certainly owned it!

Was so fun to be there with our friends, get time to hang out and relax for the weekend.

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The forest is pretty stunning to hike up through. We’ve seen colobus monkeys before and baboons even came to visit the campsite.

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Taking a hike

Mika got into the backpack for the first time and we went for a hike. About 10 minutes in she passed out.

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The crew

Exploring Lalibela with Mika

In May we decided it was time to take on our first real adventure as a team – Mika and I. We headed to Lalibela, Mika in the backpack, for a long weekend with a friend visiting Ethiopia, Jenn, who I had taught with in India and Chris a friend and colleague from school in Addis.

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Standing in front of St George Church

It was certainly a different experience for me and I was grateful to help friends to help us out along the way as I developed my new skills of how to travel rough with a baby. Lucky for me Mika is such a social wee girl, loves being in the backpack and is up for as much as an adventure as I am.

 

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Mika sitting in the entrance to one of the churches

It was a great weekend exploring the city and churches and I was glad for the company and support to help carry Mika around in the heat. She loved the priests and their crosses.

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Making friends everywhere

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The markets are always one of my favourite places when I travel. I love seeing what is for sale, how people go about their sales and trades, the movement and conversations. This market did not disappoint it was bustling with so much activity and friendly faces welcoming us.

On Sunday morning Jenn and I got up early to head down to one of the cluster of churches to see how busy it would be when service was happening. We weren’t disappointed, around every corner there were floods of people praying, priests blessing people and movement in and out of the churches.

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Young girl we met outside one of the churches

 

We had a great weekend exploring the town, churches and markets — this girl is always smiling, always waving, always happy… thank you Lalibela for your warmth and beautiful people just like my little Habesha.

Climbing Nyiragongo Volcano in DRC

I inched out of my damp sleeping bag that had been caught in the rain on the climb up the volcano. Even though my head was saying no, I couldn’t get comfortable with the thin ground mat and tent between me and the volcanic rock I was trying to settle in on. My head was thumping and I felt like crap but the rangers had called us out convinced we had to take a look. We crawled across the volcanic rock and up a few meters from our camping ledge and peered down… I instantly felt heat on my face, could hear the gas explosions below and was mesmerized by the sight in front of me, I hadn’t imagined this at all.

I had gazed up at the volcano seeing the golden glow in the sky late at night from Rwanda for a year before I managed to convince my friend Shannon to take a trip back with me to Rwanda and cross the boarder into DRC to make the climb up. I am not sure I mentioned we would be sleeping on volcanic rock on a small ledge and only meters from the craters edge… I’m not sure I really knew either but it was so worth the effort!

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That was in October 2010 and now almost five years on I was back again to take on Mount Nyiragongo with more great friends. They asked how tough it was and I mentioned it must have been an easy climb as I couldn’t really remember it being a challenge. However, five years on, a bunch more kilos under the belt, age catching up on me and still not having got my act together following a broken ankle last year it was far from easy!

We were picked up from the boarder where Gisenyi (Rwanda’s most North western town) meets Goma at the top of Lake Kivu which boarders both countries. The crossing is simple once you have your paperwork for the DRC side (see information below in ‘how to’ section below) and make sure you bring your yellow fever certificate for DRC. The process took about 15 minutes and then we were met by Elie from Virunga Parks and taken to the office to sign in for the hike.

Park signs at the bottom of the trail

Park signs at the bottom of the trail – show a bit of wear and tear

Once we were signed in at the office we set off up the road towards Nyiragongo to meet up with the rest of the group and start the climb. The drive is about 30 minutes from Goma town and as we got closed the volcano started to appear. Mount Nyiragongo is Africa’s most active volcano standing at 3470m at the crater rim just North of Goma in the East of DRC. The volcano last erupted in 2002 causing large scale evacuation and destroying part of Goma town and the airport. All the roads around Goma bare signs of this with volcanic rock on every road you’re on.

Heading up the road towards the start of the climb

Heading up the road towards the start of the climb

By 11am we were ready to set off from the starting point at 1996m we had to climb to 3470m to the top. A group of fifteen tourists set off on the trail after a briefing from the guides and rangers. Most people had hired a porter who are readily available at the start of the trek (great to support the local community) between two of them carrying their packs and gear for the night. So with the rangers and porters we were close to 30 people.

Starting point at 1996m

Starting point at 1996m… only 1500m vertical to ascend. Nyiragongo rising up in the background.

The first section of the climb was through the bush

The first section of the climb was a very gradual climb through the bush

We took scheduled breaks along the way as each section of the climb changed in terms of vegetation and steepness. This also allowed the group to keep together and everyone to catch up. The pace our group had set was pretty fast at first and certainly slowed as we got to a higher altitude – my lungs were in my ears by the time we reached the last break.

Large section that was over rough volcanic rock

Then into a large section over rough volcanic rock and gradually got steeper after each break.

Nearing the final section

Rain came in for part of the climb and it cooled off

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Looking down

Looking back down towards Goma over the final steep section of volcanic rock

Once we reached the top, after about 5 and a half hours of climbing, we made a fast move into our cabin/ tent and changed out of our wet clothes. The temperature at the top was significantly cooler and we were feeling pretty rough from the last section of the climb so after having a brief look into the crater took a short nap. I won’t lie I felt like a new woman after sleeping even for just 30 minutes (I highly recommend it if you feel crappy when you get to the top).

Cabins at the top

Cabins at the top – home for the night.

View into the Crater from the top

View into the Crater from the top

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The main crater is about two kilometers in width

Groupie at the top

Groupie at the top

View into the crater

View into the crater at night – you can feel the head and see the larva bubbling

Amazing smell, sounds and views - mesmerising

Amazing smell, sounds and views – mesmerising

After a solid nights sleep of about 10 hours (everyone was in bed early) we started the decent. We started walking before 7am and were back down at the car park by 11am. I recommend you take a rain coat if you plan to do this trek no matter what time of year – about 15 minutes from the end of the trail the rain came in hard – we felt sorry for the people who were just starting to head up for the night as they were going to be drenched all day.

Heading back down

Heading back down – a steep decent from the top.

The trek back down

The trek back down

Printing some photos from the porters on my Polaroid printer

Spent some time taking photos and printing some photos from the porters on my Polaroid printer

So want to make the trip and want to know how and some TIPS?

I highly recommend the trek – its safe and you are well supported. Contact the Virunga Parks directly for advice they are helpful on email and respond quickly to questions.

What to take?

Food supplies…  You need to take food for lunch on the way up and dinner at the top. You will also need something from breakfast before you start the climb down early in the morning. We prepared some pasta for dinner pre-cooked so we didn’t need to buy coal and cook at the top (its way too cold to sit outside for too long). We also took a bunch of snacks to eat on the way up and down – so at each stopping point had a snack rather than a big meal.

Clothing wise. Its cold at the top and its likely to rain at some stage on the way up or down (we had rain both ways) so bring a jacket and cover for your bag. You need a change of clothes to put on at the top. I took a long sleeve thermal and large warm sweatshirt, beanie (woolen hat), long skin pants, long wooly socks. I also would have liked to have had gloves as it would have been more comfortable staying outside to watch the volcano at night.

Sleeping. There is a wooden hut with a tent inside for you to sleep in. Inside the tent has a good mat and pillow to sleep on. You need to bring your own sleeping bag. We were warm in our clothes and sleeping bags.

Shoes? It really depends on your preference and how strong your ankles are. We all wore trainers but there were some in hiking boots. I hate boots so my Asics running shoes did the trick for me and I had a broken ankle just last year. However, there is a huge amount of volcanic rock you have to walk on so make sure your shoes at least have good grip – I also used a walking stick (as did loads of others) which was really helpful on the way down.

Money for tips and other. Make sure you have small USD and make sure none of them have as much as a small nick in them. They won’t be accepted in DRC by anyone if they even have a tiny tear in them, so make sure you have recent notes and small denominations. You will need to pay a porter to carry your bag (trust me you want this – I’m pretty sure everyone in the group used someone) 12usd per day (24 total for the way up and back). You will also have at least 3 rangers with the group who deserve a  tip as well. Coal is 5usd a bag as is a walking stick you can get to use if you think you want either. The walking stick I ended up using and it was really helpful on the way down on the loose rock.

How do you do it?

Visit Virunga National Parks website that will talk you through everything. Permits for the climb and park including overnight at the top cost $250usd can all be booked online http://visitvirunga.org/treks/

Once you have your permit order number you will be able to apply for a DRC Visa (Valid for 2 weeks) for $105usd https://visitvirunga.org/visa/visa-application/

You will also need to book transport from Goma to Kibati (the start of the trek) which can be done online for $28usd per head (Again through Virunga National parks website)

You can stay in Gisenyi on Rwanda side and cross over the morning of your hike and leave the day you come down or stay in Goma to do some other activities – plenty of information on the website also. Crossing over at the boarder took about 20-30 mins either way and was simple with the permit and pre-approved visa.

Trekking in Tigray…

A few friends and I spent a four day weekend at the end of May trekking in Tigray organised by Tesfa Tours. It was a few days that felt like weeks away from the bustle of Addis and work and we were treated to hiking in some of the most stunning landscape I have ever seen.

Views from top on Day3

Views from top of the plateau we hiked up onto Day 3

A quick flight up from Addis Ababa to Axum and then 2 hour drive East to the start of our trek not far from Adigrat. We pulled off the side of the road and were met by two local men and their donkeys who would carry our bags for the day up to our first guesthouse perched at 3,000m up at Enaf. We stepped out of the van and within ten minutes set off up the trail.

Donkeys loaded up

Donkey loaded up with our shared bags

The walk up for the first day was gradual and once we got off the gravel road the landscape changed and we could see amazing views across the valley ahead of us. As we negotiated our way along the plateau it opened up and we were met with children herding goats and sheep home for the night and excited to see guests approaching before the hurried off down the steep side of the cliffs to the valley below and home for the night.

Panorama view of the valley and guesthouse

Panorama view of the valley and guesthouse at Enaf

As we stood on the cliff top gazing at the breath taking views across the Agame massif and villages below you couldn’t help but feel tiny as the huge and stunning landscape reached as far as the eye could see. We settled into the guesthouse, had a quick dinner and headed to bed early falling asleep to the sounds of donkeys calling out in the valley below.

Sunrise on the start of day 2

The sunrise at the start of day 2

We woke up to a beautiful sunrise which slowly revealed the stunning valley and landscape below. As the sun got higher more mountain peaks started to appear and we could see in the far distance where we were headed over the next few days.

Stunning views across the valley below

Views across the valley below

Looking out the doorway from the guesthouse

Looking out the doorway from the guesthouse

Before we set off walking we ate our breakfast of scrambled eggs and bread on the rooftop of the guesthouse. As you can see the view wasn’t too bad from up there.

Breakfast on the rooftop of the Guesthouse at

Breakfast on the rooftop of the Guesthouse at Enaf

One of the ladies who took care of our meals at the guesthouse

One of the ladies who took care of our meals at the guesthouse

Another of our stunning cooks from the guesthouse

Another of our stunning cooks from the guesthouse

The guard at the guesthouse pulled his gun out to pose for a photo

The guard at the guesthouse pulled his gun out to pose for a photo with a view

As we made our way along the edge of the plateau we shared the trail with donkeys, cows, sheep, goats and their minders making their way up the paths towards higher grazing areas. We then started the long decent down into the valley below and continued along it and up towards our next guesthouse.

Heading down into the valley

Heading down into the valley

day 2

Heading along a trail

Finally down in the valley

Finally down in the valley

We arrived at the next guesthouse, Gohgot, which was tucked in at the bottom of a cliff.  After a hearty lunch meal of shiro and injera and rested for a few hours in the afternoon in preparation for another hike to a nearby rock-hewn church.

Panorama from guesthouse 2

Panorama from guesthouse at Gohgot

young girl at day 2 guesthouse

Young girl at the guesthouse

In the afternoon we took in a two hour round hike to Gohgot Eyesus church which was tucked up in one of the nearby valleys. We had to hail the priest to bring the key and climb with us so we could go inside before climbing up to the entrance.

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Gohgot Eyesus church

Priests hands

The priest clasps his cross

Mother & baby on the trail

Mother & baby on the trail

On the third day the scenery changed we trekked across the valley for a few hours passing schools, people busy farming, and by children running out to greet us before we started our climb up another mountain.

across the valley on day 3

Donkeys carrying water joined us as we crossed the valley and approached our next climb

The climb led us along trails that weaved along the edge of the cliff and provided spectacular views across the valley where we had come from over the past few days.

Panorama of the trail

The donkey comes along the trail while Meghan waits up ahead looking over the valley we have just crossed

Heading up day3

Nathan heading up the final climb to the plateau

Sheep on day 3

Some sheep who greeted us at the top

The plateau we were staying on for the last night was quite small with only four families homes on top and the guesthouse. This offered us stunning views of the Gheralta Mountains in the distance, where we would be heading the next day to visit one of the rock-hewn churches, and all sides of the valleys around us.

Views on day 3 top

View out one side of the plateau

The guest house of day 3 at Shimbrety

The guest house at Shimbrety perched on the edge of the plateau

We visited with a family who lived next to the guesthouse and shared the always great Ethiopian hospitality, coffee and conversation. One of the young boys from the family had joined us earlier in the day as we had explored the edge of the cliff and watched a family of Gelada baboons make their way around the cliff edges, playing, eating and enticing one another.

The hoodie gang

The hoodie gang

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One of the girls from the family

One of the girls from the family

pooh pile

A pile of cow pooh once dried used for lighting fires and building walls

Again the next morning we woke up early and looked like someone had taken a paint brush to the sky and then keep spraying new colours across the canvas as the sun rose. The low cloud made for some spectacular scenes as it wrapped itself around the cliffs and covered the valley below.

sunrise was stunning

Sunrise…

sunrise with the mist

Low clouds over the valley

Sunrise

A young girl came out to meet us as her dog barked and warned us to stay well clear of her home. It was a sweet exchange as she asked for her photo to be taken and once she saw flashed a smile it headed back to her house pleased. (The photo will make its way back up to her in the new trekking season after the rains!)

Day 4 morning

The colours she was wearing matched the landscape

Young girl

The polaroid came out for the final time and we took and shared some photos with our great hosts  before we headed off down the side of the mountain and onto our final adventure and climb to Abuna Yemata church.

From the final guesthouse

Loads of beautiful people and smiles

Day 4 heading down

One of the final views as we reached the valley below

I would recommend this trip to anyone who loves nature, people and doing something that will give you a real taste of Ethiopian culture and the beauty of this country. I would go again tomorrow…. Want to make this journey too? Contact Tesfa Tours based in Addis Ababa – community based tourism. Email info@tesfatours.com http://www.tesfatours.com/contact-tesfa-tours/

Also helps to have great friends along on the journey!

More than FAITH needed – Ethiopia

We picked up our local guide Gebre from a small town as we headed towards the Gheralta Mountains. After four days of trekking through breathtaking landscape of Tigray in Northern Ethiopia we were headed for our final adventure before heading back to Addis, our visit to the rock-hewn church of Abuna Yemata Guh tucked away in some cliffs a hair raising climb away.

Starting the walk towards the rock face we need to climb

Starting the walk towards the rock face we need to climb

The churches in the Gheralta cluster of churches, around 30, are believed by locals to have been built back in the 4th to 6th century but its more commonly thought they were built between the 9th and 12th centuries. Either way they are phenomenal in their location, structure and certainly not built for those afraid of heights. If you’re wanting to get closer to God and have your prayers sent on up – you’re certainly in the right place by taking an adventure here.

A young girl herding the goats

A young girl herding the goats

Even though I had visited the area and this church five years earlier, and had been rambling on about it to my friends for weeks, nothing looked familiar. When we pulled off the road to park I still couldn’t make out the rock face we had climbed years earlier and was convinced we were in the wrong place. However, as we started our walk across the flat valley towards the rock face my memory partly restored and the landscape reveled a glimpse at the climb up ahead of us.

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The church entrance is tucked around the backside of the right hand rock pillar and completely out of sight until you enter the cave door. Unless you have a local guide you would possibly never find it as once you reach the rock face there is no clear path showing the way.
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The walk across the valley floor leading up is gradual and starts to reveal how steep the final parts of the decent will be but its not until you hit the end of the trail that you realise what is potentially ahead of you. It was mid morning when we reached the face and already hot when we started to use our hands to help negotiate the first section of the climb over the rocks.
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Once we reached the free climb section which consisted of sandstone walls we were asked to take our shoes off and leave them in order to continue the climb. At this point we had reached what was considered the church grounds and taking our shoes off also provided much needed grip for the 90 degree rock face we were ascending.
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The pack of men who had joined us and we had all been thinking the same thing “I can carry my own bag and I really don’t need your help”, soon became our safety nets and mules for safely carrying our bags and supporting us up the rock faces. They placed themselves ahead and behind us offering protection and guidance for every small foot and hand hold we could use. This is when my battle with keeping my camera out and the men looking at me slightly flustered asking to take it began. My stubbornness versus their extensive knowledge and climbing ability were a fine match which they eventually won and only the iPHONE stayed out.
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I had warned my friends that there was one tough section that really was like rock climbing but I hadn’t remembered it being as challenging or long as it seemed this time – maybe my age was catching up to me, I certainly didn’t feel as nimble as I had years earlier but also was on my own so wasn’t thinking about others.  I worried about the stress I was putting my friend through and hoped that I hadn’t built the view and church up to something more than what it was and I had remembered. I wondered if maybe the exhilaration of the climb had made the church and its location seem amazing and I did my own little prayer that they would be as impressed and amazed by the whole experience as I was.
The entrance to the church is along this ledge

Friends and Gebre peaking out the entrance to the church is along this ledge you make the final walk

So many questions entered my mind again as I reached the final ledge that you have to walk leading to the cave like entrance of the
Why? How? Why was it built here? How did they do it?
The view out the doorway of the entrance

The view out the doorway of the church entrance

As we rested in the church looking at the paintings, catching our breath and pondering how difficult the climb down would be seeing where you were headed, Gebre told us about the history of the church. He mentioned and showed us where the elders would rest and how baptisms happened at the church – mothers would climb with their babies up to have them baptised. We all looked at each other as if he was possibly joking – no joke. I certainly sat humbled at people’s conviction to their faith and the heights they would go to in order to get their blessings and have their prayers heard.

9 of the 12 apostles on the roof of the church

9 of the 12 apostles on the roof of the church

Old paintings cover the walls

Old paintings cover the walls

The priest shows us old texts

The priest shows us old texts

Old texts inside Abun

Old texts

The climb down was epic but not as frightening as anticipated. With our new built trust in our guides and the adrenaline still pumping we were all pretty pleased to reach our shoes and resume the walk on more level ground.

Is the climb worth it? Yep… I’d do it a third time for sure!

The climb down

Meghan & Edy negotiating the climb down